Survivor Poetry- ‘Days When It Feels Like No One’s On Your Side’

  Days when it feels like no one’s on your side and you have to hide from your own mind and the twisted often too realistic thoughts that control you and push you and pull you and all that you can do is to pretend to be fine there’s nothing on your mind thank God that most people are blind to anything further past the smiling mask that you’ve crafted until at last it’s mastered and plastered overtop of the broken face takes it’s place and you’re safe from the world outside but too soon you find that the terror’s inside. and no one can help ’cause you can’t escape from yourself so you put it all away on a shelf in the back of your heart you don’t want any part of the sickening past but all too fast it comes back and attacks and it’s hard, you soon find to control your own mind these voice keep screaming at you all the time you enter a trance as if you’re daydreaming you keeping seeing pictures, but you can tell what’s real and you feel like your about to burst cause it hurts so much more than words can...

11 Things That Can Help You Recover from Abuse

“I am bigger than anything that can happen to me. All these things: sorrow, misfortune, and suffering, are outside my door. I am inside the house, and I have the key.” – Charles Fletcher Lummis Speak. Shame feeds on silence. Talking about that abuse might seem like the last thing you want to do, but speaking out about what happened to you and letting other people in takes away the power of the depression and the shame and gives that power back to you. Don’t know who to talk to? Confide in a parent or a friend, a coach, a guidance counselor, a brother or sister, a cousin, an aunt or uncle, a grandparent, a minister, priest or rabbi. Or, call a hotline, for example: The National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline, a national 24-hour resource, can be accessed by phone (1-866-331-9474 & 1-866-331-8453 TTY) or the National Domestic Violence Hotline (1-800-799-SAFE)  Or, visit www.loveisrespect.org to access an online help page. Find a therapist or a support group. Talking to a professional or joining an organized survivor group can be pivotal for some victims. It can help you to understand that what happened to you is not your fault, and that the things you are struggling with are often normal symptoms of abuse.  It is important to find a therapist or group that you feel comfortable with. There are lots of great therapists out there and they can do wonders in your life if you are brave enough to put in the work. Psychology Today has a great source to help find therapists in your area:  http://therapists.psychologytoday.com/rms/. Other good resource centers can be found at facilities specialized in...